Unfortunately this project has faded into the background due to the current Corona situation (seniors belong to the risk group)
and will be resumed as soon as the sitzuation allowes it. We'll keep you postet!

Project M A D E R OxX® Includes The Listed Aspects That Are Defined for Quality Health Care in The National Quality Policy and Strategy Handbook WHO 2018:

Quality health care can be defined in many ways but there is growing acknowledgement that quality health services across the world should be

  • Effective: providing evidence-based health care services to those who need them.
  • Safe: avoiding harm to people for whom the care is intended.
  • People-centred: providing care that responds to individual preferences, needs and values.

In addition, in order to realize the benefits of quality health care, health services must be:
  • Timely: reducing waiting times and sometimes harmful delays for both those who receive and those who give care.
  • Equitable: providing care that does not vary in quality on account of age, sex, gender, race, ethnicity, geographical location, religion, socioeconomic status, linguistic or political affiliation.
  • Integrated: providing care that is coordinated across levels and providers and makes available the full range of health services throughout the life course.
  • Efficient: maximizing the benefit of available resources and avoiding waste.
(HANDBOOK FOR NATIONAL QUALITY POLICY AND STRATEGY WHO 2018/S. 13)

Healthy Aging and Mental Health - Two Reasons To Forster This Project
Focused research, new metrics and methods could give a far better understanding of Healthy Ageing and are essential for evidence-informed policy and evaluation. To achieve this, appropriate measures of Healthy Ageing need to be agreed on and collected through vital statistics, health and social care services, and population surveys across countries. Research in a range of fields contributing to Healthy Ageing across the life course is also required, as are mechanisms to ensure its rapid translation into clinical practice, systems strengthening, population-based health interventions, and shaping of health and broader socio-economic policies.

(WHO Website: Data and Research 2019)


Guiding Principles & Core Values for the Decade of Healthy Ageing;
SOLIDARITY:
  • Leaving no one behind - Reaches out to all people in need and deprivation, whoever and wherever they are, targeting their specific challenges and vulnerabilities.
  • Champions equal and just opportunities to enjoy the determinants and enablers of healthy ageing, including those relating to social or economic status, age, gender, place of birth or residence, migrant status, level of ability. This may at times require an unequal attention on some population groups to bring the greatest benefit to the least advantaged, or most vulnerable or marginalized members of society.
    (WHO Handbook for National Quality Policy and Strategy 2018)

Providing Equal Opportunities for Workers to Upgrade Their Skills, Assistance and Retraining...
According to the WHO: Globally, the number of older persons is growing faster than the number of people in all younger age groups. By 2030, older persons will outnumber children under 10 (1.41 billion versus 1.35 billion). Therefore, we will need more jobs for older people. We need to prevent ageism, ensuring a person-centred approach to patient care -without financial hardship, developing knowledge and skills in geriatric care and improving health literacy will help promote health. Providing equal opportunities for workers to upgrade their skills, assistance and retraining after job loss and removing barriers to retain and hire older workers can all help limit age-based discrimination.

(WHO 2019: Decade of Healthy Ageing 2020-2030)

The project M A D E R OxX® will provide a new effective complementary therapeutic method also for the use in palliative care. M A D E R OxX® will provide professionals with a new effective therapeutic tool. The project also offers opportunities for volunteers to upgrade their skills in offering professional assistance in Palliative Care.

We want to apply for Helsinki!

Project Management:

  • Sandra Ulrich
    Specialized in Spiritual Care in Palliative Care, Grief Counseling, Personal Engagement to Foster Trauma Informed Care
    (Switzerland/USA)
  • Stv. Jacqueline Canacik
    Member of the Management RFM GmbH Dept. Palliative Beratung (Switzerland)


Physician Support:
  • Dr. med. Gregor Dufner, Switzerland
Project Implementation Partner
  • Non Profit Organisation MENTAL HEALTH Switzerland
    on the advisory board with Joachim Eder, Former Health Care Director and Former Member of the Country Council in Switzerland.
    on the advisory board with Professor Maya Zumstein-Shaha, Deputy Head of the Master of Science in Nursing, University Bern, Switzerland
  • Alterszentren Zug
A social project worth supporting!

Thomas Aeschi,
National Council, Switzerland

"I highly appreciate this commitment to Palliative Care and consider this project to be  supportive because it addresses a topic that will become more important in the future"

Urs Raschle,  
City Council, Switzerland

"A win-win situation, for those taking and for those giving. I am glad that this promising project will be put in action here in the city of Zug."

The first part of this project was successfully completed in November 2019. A big thank you goes to this amazing team:

- Christine Brunner, Registred Nurse Advanced Federal Diploma of Higher Education, Dipl. DORN. Therapist, Switzerland
- Agnes Ulrich-Brotschi, Dipl. Ergotherapist HF, Dipl. Yogatherapist YCH/EYV, Dipl. Svastha, Switzerland
- Ana Jeremic, Dipl. Masseur und Madero Expert, Switzerland
- Barbara Spandau, Specialized in Geriatric Nursing and Palliative Care with Pain Management in Cancer, Germany

-
Sandra Jeremic, Konsens International AG, Switzerland
- Giovanni B. Ming, Ming Schreinerei, Switzerland
- Peter Twigt, Osteopath D.O. MSc. in Ost. med., dipl. Physiotherapist and Founder TZZ Therapie Zentrum Zug, Switzerland